Best Close-ups in Films

Close-ups. Don’t we just love them? They can exude different feelings: happiness, despondence, fear, etc. Here are some of my favorite (and might be the best) close-ups.

L’IMPORTANT C’EST D’AIMER (1975)

Romy Schneider as Nadine Chevalier

Directed by: Andrzej Zulawski

The close-up of Romy Schneider’s face along with Georges Delerue’s haunting music is one of the most hypnotizing moments I’ve seen onscreen. Romy breaking the fourth wall makes this scene more sincere and heartbreaking. She’s not just acting, she’s also talking to the audience. Romy’s passionate performance, Delerue’s brilliant score, and Andrzej Zulawski’s delicate direction make such an iconic scene. Wonderful.


VIVRE SA VIE (1962)

Anna Karina as Nana Kleinfrankenheim

Directed by: Jean-Luc Godard

One word: Dramatic.

PSYCHO (1960)

Janet Leigh as Marion Crane

Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock

No explanation needed.

PSYCHO (1960)

Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates


Directed by:
Hitchcock

THE SHINING (1980)

Jack Nicholson as Jack Torrance

Directed by: Stanley Kubrick

THE GODFATHER II (1974)

Al Pacino as Michael Corleone

Directed by: Francis Ford Coppola

That cold look on Michael Corleone’s (Pacino) face along with Nino Rota’s haunting music is unforgettable.

BREATHLESS (1960)

Jean Seberg as Patricia Franchini

Directed by: Godard

THE ELEPHANT MAN (1980)

Anthony Hopkins as Frederick Treves

Directed by: David Lynch

This is the first time Frederick Treves (Hopkins) saw John Merrick a.k.a. The Elephant Man (John Hurt). Splendid and touching!

SPLENDOR IN THE GRASS (1960)

Natalie Wood as Deanie Loomis

Directed by: Elia Kazan

Don’t you dare! Don’t you dare, mom! Don’t you dare…don’t you dare…!” Depression can make you look like this.

EYES WIDE SHUT (1999)

Nicole Kidman as Alice Harford

Directed by: Kubrick

Ah! That wicked smile.

BONNIE AND CLYDE (1967)

Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker

Directed by: Arthur Penn

This is a brief shot in the ambush scene. Bonnie (Dunaway) looked at her beloved Clyde (Warren Beatty) when they realized that they are about to be machine-gunned by the police.

Dunaway’s face says a lot. She’s like saying:
Oh no, we blew it, honey.

or

What now, my love?

or maybe,

I’ll always have you.

Or she could be saying (as suggested by an acquaintance):

This is it, Clyde!

CASINO ROYALE (2006)

Daniel Craig as James Bond

Directed by: Martin Campbell

With that look, Craig gives 007 a new attitude.

REPULSION (1965)

Catherine Deneuve as Carol Ledoux

Directed by: Roman Polanski

Kinda borrowed from Hitchcock’s Psycho (shower scene).

THE WILD BUNCH (1969)

William Holden as Pike Bishop

Directed by: Sam Peckinpah

While robbing a bank, Pike Bishop (Holden) commands his bunch by saying: “If they move, *kill ’em*!” Holden said it with conviction. That is one of the most famous lines from the movie. Holden’s face looks so tough.

THE VIRGIN SUICIDES (1999)

Kirsten Dunst as Lux Lisbon

Directed by: Sofia Coppola

This is what you call “love at first sight.” Trip (Josh Hartnett) and Lux (Dunst) fell in love the moment they saw each other for the first time. Cute! ☺

DISCLAIMER: No copyright infringement intended. I don’t own or claim to own any of the photos used.



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